A microservices implementation retrospective

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Over the last year at realestate.com.au (REA), I worked on two integration projects that involved synchronising data between large, third party applications. We implemented the synchronisation functionality using microservices. Our team, along with many others at REA, chose to use a microservice architecture to avoid the problems associated with the “tightly coupled monolith” anti-pattern, and make services that are easy to maintain, reuse and even rewrite.

Our design used microservices in 3 different roles:

  1. Stable interfaces – in front of each application we put a service that exposed a RESTful API for the underlying domain objects. This minimised the amount of coupling between the internals of the application and the other services.
  2. Event feeds – each “change” to the domain objects that we cared about within the third party applications was exposed by an event feed service.
  3. Synchronisers – the “sync” services ran at regular intervals, reading from the event feeds, then using the stable interfaces to make the appropriate data updates.

Integration Microservices Design

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