Lean QA (aka QA Ops)

 

Developers have – with the advent of DevOps – been working more and more in Operations and Infrastructure. Testers however, have not.

Thus far, the testing personnel have been mostly or wholly assigned to application testing work. As SOFTWARE testers, we have only worked on software – and then mostly only on application software.

I pose the questions: What about infrastructure as code? Should that not be explicitly tested?

And: if Testers are meant to be testing the system, why then have they not explicitly been testing the whole system, infrastructure included?

I am going to make a case here for including QA in Operations and Infrastructure, by clarifying how I see the QA fitting in the DevOps world. Continue reading

AWS API Gateway, Lambda and Swagger

TL;DR

With this article you will be able to build

With

Building upon

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Create a full-stack serverless web-app with a single file

Serverless is one of the biggest buzzwords of these years, and the implementation of solutions based on such architecture has been boosted by the release of AWS Lambda. This post describes a little experiment I conducted to learn more about this technology. I wanted to define and deploy a fully functional web-app (both back-end and front-end) based on RESTful services with one single file. Continue reading

Fewer AWS accounts please (aka the “goldilocks” strategy is back)

REA’s journey with Amazon Web Services (AWS) began in late 2010 when we started experimenting with using the cloud for our dev/test infrastructure. In 2013 we launched our first cloud-only production infrastructure to handle the dynamic resizing and serving of our images. Since that time we have adopted an IT strategy that involved transitioning all systems to the cloud and have therefore run a hybrid cloud and data centre platform ever since. More recently we have also embraced micro-services which means the volume of systems that we run in the cloud has exploded. This blog covers how our usage of AWS accounts and VPCs has changed and what we propose to do next.

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How We (Mostly) Survived The Stormy Apocalypse!

It’s not news to anyone any more, so I’m sure everyone knows Amazon Web Services (our major cloud infrastructure provider) suffered an outage within one of their availability zones on Sunday June 5th. AWS is split up into various geographic regions, and within each region, a number of availability zones. I’m going to assume most readers know about this, but if you don’t, check out Amazon on how they describe these things. On Sunday one of these availability zones suffered a “power event”, owing to Sydney’s wild weather on the weekend, bringing it to its knees. Lots of Australian based websites had major problems.

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